Formerly the CT River Watershed Council|info@ctriver.org

River Orgs Partner to Celebrate Finale of CT River Journey

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River Orgs Partner to Celebrate Finale of CT River Journey

Connecticut River Museum Will Participate in the Last Leg of the

Connecticut River Conservancy’s Source to Sea Jump-In Journey,

Celebrating 65 years of success and work still to do

To celebrate its 65th anniversary, the Connecticut River Conservancy (CRC), formerly Connecticut River Watershed Council, is traveling the length of the Connecticut River this month to celebrate the many successes that have significantly improved the health of New England’s great river. Just as importantly, this Journey will lay out the work still to be done to meet the legal requirements and public expectations to make our rivers truly clean and full of life. CRC Executive Director Andrew Fisk and his wife Karen will make the trip down the Connecticut River. You can learn more or follow the Journey online at www.ctriver.org/s2sjourney.

On Sunday July 30 the trip will come to a close with a sail to the River’s mouth aboard Onrust.  Participants from both the Connecticut River Museum and the Connecticut River Conservancy will take a sunset sail on the vessel, a replica of Adriaen Block’s 1614 ship, the first European ship to sail up the Connecticut River.

The Source to Sea Jump-In Journey began at the source of the Connecticut River near the Canadian border on July 15 and ends at the Long Island Sound on July 30. The Source to Sea Jump-In Journey is an opportunity for everyone who loves our rivers to join CRC in speaking up for our rivers.

The public has participated in the Source to Sea Jump-In Journey at events celebrating the many ways people use, enjoy, and take sustenance from their rivers. These events included opportunities to directly engage with important issues as well as have fun and celebrate. Opportunities include boating events as well as joining Splash Mobs, ‘flash mob’ style events where groups of river fans jump in the river to publicly show support for their rivers.  “Our rivers have come a long way,” says CRC Executive Director Andrew Fisk. “This Journey is retracing a trip taken by one of our trustees in 1959. Back then, they wore gas masks and scooped sludge from the river to highlight pollution problems. On this Journey, we have the pleasure of highlighting how clean our rivers have become and all the great ways people use our rivers for recreation. But our rivers still face challenges every single day. Our job is to find environmental problems and help solve them.”

The important work that remains to be done includes:

  • Removing deadbeat dams and making flood ready culverts to connect habitat and protect infrastructure
  • Restoring migratory fish populations so that millions of fish return each year
  • Fighting roll-backs of environmental regulations that protect our rivers, streams and lakes
  • Investing in aging and outdated water and wastewater infrastructure

About the Connecticut River Conservancy

Since 1952, Connecticut River Conservancy has been the voice for the Connecticut River watershed, from source to sea. We collaborate with partners across four states to protect and advocate for your rivers and educate and engage communities. We bring people together to prevent pollution, improve habitat, and promote enjoyment of your river and its tributary streams. Healthy rivers support healthy economies. To learn more about CRC, or to make a contribution to help protect the Connecticut River, visit www.ctriver.org.

 

About the Connecticut River Museum

The Connecticut River Museum is the only museum dedicated to the study, preservation and celebration of the cultural and natural heritage of the Connecticut River and its Valley.  The Connecticut River Museum is located at 67 Main Street, Essex and is open Tuesday – Sunday from 10:00 am – 5:00 pm.  For more information about exhibits, programs, or to visit, please visit the website, ctrivermuseum.org.

 

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